Unmanned

Title:                      Unmanned

Author:                William M. Arkin

Arkin, William M. (2015). Unmanned: Drones, Data, And The Illusion of Perfect Warfare. New York: Little, Brown and Company

LCCN:    2015931408

UG1242.D7 A74 2015

Summary

  • “Unmanned is an in-depth examination of why seemingly successful wars never seem to end. The problem centers on drones, now accumulated in the thousands, the front end of a spying and killing machine that is disconnected from either security or safety. Drones, however, are only part of the problem. William Arkin shows that security is actually undermined by an impulse to gather as much data as possible, the appetite and the theory both skewed towards the notion that no amount is too much. And yet the very endeavor of putting fewer human in potential danger places everyone in greater danger. Wars officially end, but the Data Machine lives on forever. Throughout his career, Arkin has exposed powerful secrets of so-called national security and intelligence. Now he continues that tradition. The most alarming book about warfare in years, Unmanned is essential reading for anyone who cares about the future of mankind.”–Provided from Amazon.com.

Contents

  • Search of the wind — Dead reckoning — Fire and forget — Trojan spirit — Dialogue of the deaf — Another plane — Inherit the wind — My back is killing me — The machine builds — The split — The explosion — Flock of birds — Mind-set over mind — Gilgamesh calling — Beyond the speed of war — X-men — Ring of fiber — Command posts of the future — Oh. Obama was elected — Pattern of life — Warka — Epilogue: the event.

Subjects

 

Date Posted:      August 26, 2016

For a review see Bergen, Peter L. (2015) and Daniel Rothenberg, eds. Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, And Policy. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press

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A History of Modern Espionage

Title:                      A History of Modern Espionage

Author:                 Allison Ind

Ind, Allison (1965). A History of Modern Espionage. London: Hodder and Stoughton.

LCCN:    65005468

UB270 .I48

Subjects

Notes

  • Some material in this book is based on the book A Short History of Espionage. [New York: D. McKay Co. LCCN: 63011581]

Date Posted:      August 26, 2016

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]

Colonel Allison Ind’s (Army of the United States, retired) A Short History of Espionage, is an abbreviated version of espionage history beginning in antiquity and continuing through the American Civil War, the Spanish American War, World War I, World War II, and through the postwar period to the Bay of Pigs in Cuba. lnd concentrates on appraisals of the methods of modern espionage in England, France, Germany, and the Soviet Union. His assessments of both espionage and counterespionage are vigorously expressed to provide valid analyses and he draws on his experiences as an intelligence specialist with the U.S. Army in the Far East from 1940 to 1961.

Ind produced an expanded version of A Short History of Espionage, the title of this review. This study includes new material dealing with a number of outstanding British and Western European cases.

[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., pp. 140-141

 

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A Theory of The Drone

Title:                      A Theory of The Drone

Author:                 Gregoire Chamayou

Chamayou, Grégoire (2015), translated by Janet Lloyd. A Theory of The Drone. New York: The New Press

LCCN:    2014033225

UG479 .C53 2013

Contents

  • Techniques and tactics — Methodologies for a hostile environment — The genealogy of the predator — The theoretical principles of manhunting — Surveillance and annihilation — Pattern-of-life analysis — Kill box — Counterinsurgency from the air — Vulnerabilities — Ethos and psyche — Drones and kamikazes — “That others may die” — A crisis in military ethos — Psychopathologies of the drone — Killing from a distance — Necroethics — Combatant immunity — A humanitarian weapon — Precision — The principles of the philosophy of the right to kill — Indelicate murderers — Warfare without combat — License to kill — Political bodies — In war as in peace — Democratic militarism — The essence of combatants — The fabrication of political automata — Epilogue: on war, from a distance.

Subjects

Date Posted:      August 25, 2016

This work is reviewed by Joseph Golden at Drone Wars[1].

[1] Bergen, Peter L. (2015) and Daniel Rothenberg, eds. Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, And Policy. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press

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Sudden Justice

Title:                      Sudden Justice

Author:                 Chris Woods

Woods, Chris (2015). Sudden Justice: America’s Secret Drone Wars, New York, NY: Oxford University Press

LCCN:    2015373084

UG1242.D7 W66 2015

Date Posted:      August 24, 2016

Contents

  • View to a kill : armed drones on the battlefield — Birth of a predator : the origins of lethal drones — The rise of targeted killing : Yemen and Palestine — The cauldron : Iraq 2003-2011 — The occasional assassin : Bush in Pakistan — The enemy without : Western citizens killed by drones — Obama’s obsession : “AfPak” — Game face on : the intimacy of remote killing — An absence of transparency : Yemen and Somalia — The long road home : Afghanistan and Pakistan — The inconstant value of a civilian life — Countermeasures and critiques — Appendix: Reports of Westerners killed in US targeted strikes, September 2001 to December 2014.

Subjects

This book is reviewed by Hayden Peake in the article Drone Wars.[1]

[1] Bergen, Peter L. (2015) and Daniel Rothenberg, eds. Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, And Policy. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press

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Lords of Secrecy

Title:                      Lords of Secrecy

Author:                 Scott Horton

Horton, Scott (2015). Lords of Secrecy: The National Security Elite And America’s Stealth Warfare. New York: Nation Books

LCCN:    2014028268

JK468.S4 H67 2015

Summary

  • “State secrecy is increasingly used as the explanation for the shrinking of public discussion surrounding national security issues. The phrase “that’s classified” is increasingly used not to protect national secrets from legitimate enemies, but rather to stifle public discourse regarding national security. Washington today is inclined to see secrecy as a convenient cure to many of its problems. But too often these problems are not challenges to national security, they involve the embarrassment of political figures, disclosure of mismanagement, incompetence and corruption and even outright criminality. For national security issues to figure in democratic deliberation, the public must have access to basic facts that underlie the issues. The more those facts disappear under a cloak of state secrecy, the less space remains for democratic process and the more deliberation falls into the hands of largely unelected national security elites. The way out requires us to think much more critically and systematically about secrecy and its role in a democratic state”– Provided by publisher.

Subjects

Date Posted:      August 1, 2016

This book is reviewed at Cockburn, Andrew (2015). Kill Chain: The Rise of The High-Tech Assassins. New York: Henry Holt and Co.

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Kill Chain

Title:                      Kill Chain

Author:                 Andrew Cockburn

Cockburn, Andrew (2015). Kill Chain: The Rise of The High-Tech Assassins. New York: Henry Holt and Co.

LCCN:    2014029340

UG1242.D7 C63 2015

Summary

  • “For the first time in our military history, how we wage war is being built around a single strategy: the tracking and elimination of “high value targets”–in other words, assassination by military drone. Kill Chain is the story of how this new paradigm came to be, from WWII to the present; revealing the inner workings of these military technologies; introducing the key figures behind the transformation as well as the people on whom these deadly technologies have been tested; and illuminating the effects of drone warfare on our global image. This book will shed new light on the subject, from drone development in WWII and their use in the Vietnam War, to their embrace by the Bush administration and their controversial use by President Obama today. Cockburn will detail the corporate and political agendas that have effectively legitimized the once-banned practice of assassination, and the devastating effects of drone strikes gone awry”– Provided by publisher.

Subjects

Date Posted:      July 29, 2016

For a review, along with reviews of six other books on drones, see Bergen, Peter L. (2015) and Daniel Rothenberg, eds. Drone Wars: Transforming Conflict, Law, And Policy. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press

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Industrial Espionage And Mis-Use of Trade Secrets

Title:                      Industrial Espionage And Mis-Use of Trade Secrets

Author:                  Worth Wade

Wade, Worth (1964). Industrial Espionage And Mis-Use of Trade Secrets. Ardmore, PA:Advance House, Publishers

LCCN:    64056828

KF3197.Z9 W32

Subjects

Date Posted:      July 29, 2016

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]

Wade, chemist, patent attorney, and author, has written a handbook on all the major aspects of industrial espionage including the techniques used and the theft of trade secrets. He emphasizes security measures—both physical and .managerial. The handbook was written for business executives, security personnel, and patent counsels. Extensive bibliography.

[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., pp. 135-136

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