National Security Intelligence

Title:                      National Security Intelligence

Author:                 Loch Johnson

Johnson, Loch K. (20017). National Security Intelligence (2nd ed.) Cambridge, UK; Malden, MA: Polity

LCCN:    2016039810

JK486.I6 J64 2017

Summary

  • “National security intelligence is a vast, complex, and important topic, made doubly hard for citizens to understand because of the thick veils of secrecy that surround it. In the second edition of his definitive introduction to the field, leading intelligence expert Loch K. Johnson guides readers skilfully through this shadowy side of government. Drawing on over forty years of experience studying intelligence agencies and their activities, he explains the three primary missions of intelligence: information collection and analysis, counterintelligence, and covert action, before moving on to explore the wider dilemmas posed by the existence of secret government organizations in open, democratic societies. Recent developments including the controversial leaks by the American intelligence official Edward J. Snowden, the U.S. Senate’s Torture Report, and the ongoing debate over the use of drones are explored alongside difficult questions such as why intelligence agencies inevitably make mistakes in assessing world events; why some intelligence officers choose to engage in treason against their own country on behalf of foreign regimes; and how spy agencies can succumb to scandals -including highly intrusive surveillance against the very citizens they are meant to protect. Comprehensively revised and updated throughout, National Security Intelligence is tailor-made to meet the interests of students and general readers who care about how nations shield themselves against threats through the establishment of intelligence organizations, and how they strive for safeguards to prevent the misuse of this secret power”– Provided by publisher.

Contents

  • Machine generated contents note: Contents About the Author List of Figures and Tables List of Abbreviations Preface: The Study of National Security Intelligence Acknowledgments 1 National Security Intelligence: The First Line of Defense 2 Intelligence Collection and Analysis: Knowing about the World 3 Covert Action: Secret Attempts to Shape History 4 Counterintelligence: The Hunt for Moles 5 Safeguards against the Abuse of Secret Power 6 National Security Intelligence: Shield and Hidden Sword of the Democracies Notes Suggested Readings Index.

Subjects

Date Posted:      May 15, 2017

Reviewed in The Intelligencer[1]

“The world of intelligence is myth-ridden in the popular imagination. Loch Johnson, one of most eminent and experienced of scholars on the subject, here supplies an excellent, compact, and readable introduction that makes the principal aspects of intelligence refreshingly intelligible to all.” —Richard K. Betts, Columbia University

“… a wonderful asset for those professors aiming to introduce students to the complexities, the dangers, and the importance of the U.S. intelligence establishment. The painful truth is that most Americans know very little about our government’s intelligence agencies beyond what they have learned from movies, television shows, and lurid headlines. This book can work wonders in educating students (and indeed, ordinary citizens) seeking to understand intelligence. It is well-written, and manages to combine brevity with depth and nuance.” — David Barrett, Villanova University

In the second edition of his definitive introduction to the field, leading intelligence expert Loch K. Johnson explains the three primary missions of intelligence: information collection and analysis, counterintelligence, and covert action, before moving on to explore the wider dilemmas posed by the existence of secret government organizations in open, democratic societies. Recent developments including the controversial leaks by the contractor Edward J. Snowden, the US Senate’s Torture Report, and the ongoing debate over the use of drones are explored alongside difficult questions such as why intelligence agencies inevitably make mistakes in assessing world events; why some intelligence officers choose to engage in treason against their own country on behalf of foreign regimes; and how spy agencies can succumb to scandals—including highly intrusive surveillance against the very citizens they are meant to protect.

 

 

[1] Reviewed in The Intelligencer: Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies (22, 3, Winter 2016-17, p. 139).

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MacArthur’s Spies

Title:                      MacArthur’s Spies

Author:                Peter Eisner

Eisner, Peter (2017). MacArthur’s Spies: The Soldier, The Singer, And The Spymaster Who Defied The Japanese in World War II. New York: Viking

LCCN:    2016056837

D810.S7 E396 2017

Contents

  • The war — Occupation — Survival — Fame — Telling the story.

Subjects

Date Posted:      May 12, 2017

Reviewed in The Intelligencer[1]

MacArthur’s Spies reads like Casablanca set in the Pacific, filled with brave and daring characters caught up in the intrigue of war—and the best part is that it’s all true!” —Tom Maier

On January 2, 1942, Japanese troops marched into Manila unopposed by US forces. Manila was a strategic port, a romantic American outpost and a jewel of a city. Tokyo saw its conquest of the Philippines as the key in its plan to control all of Asia, including Australia. Thousands of soldiers surrendered and were sent on the notorious eighty-mile Bataan Death March. But thousands of other Filipinos and Americans refused to surrender and hid in the Luzon hills above Bataan and Manila. This is the story of three of them, and how they successfully foiled the Japanese for more than two years, sabotaging Japanese efforts and preparing the way for MacArthur’s return.

From a jungle hideout, Colonel John Boone, an enlisted American soldier, led an insurgent force of Filipino fighters who infiltrated Manila as workers and servants to stage demolitions and attacks.

“Chick” Parsons, an American businessman, polo player, and expatriate in Manila, was also a US Navy intelligence officer. He escaped in the guise of a Panamanian diplomat, and returned as MacArthur’s spymaster, coordinating the guerrilla efforts with the planned Allied invasion.

And, finally, there was Claire Phillips, an itinerant American torch singer with many names and almost as many husbands. Her nightclub in Manila served as a cover for supplying food to Americans in the hills and to thousands of prisoners of war. She and the men and women who worked with her gathered information from the collaborating Filipino businessmen; the homesick, English-speaking Japanese officers; and the spies who mingled in the crowd.

[1] Reviewed in The Intelligencer: Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies (22, 3, Winter 2016-17, pp. 138-139).

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The Counterintelligence Chronology

Title:                      The Counterintelligence Chronology

Author:                  Edward Mickolus

Mickolus, Edward F. (2015). The Counterintelligence Chronology: Spying By And Against The United States From The 1700s Through 2014. Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Company, Inc.,

LCCN:    2015025616

UB271.U5 M53 2015

Summary

  • “This book summarizes hundreds of cases of espionage for and against U.S. interests and offers suggestions for further reading. Milestones in the history of American counterintelligence are noted. Charts describe the motivations of traitors, American targets of foreign intelligence services and American traitors and their foreign handlers. The author discusses trends in intelligence gathering and what the future may hold”– Provided by publisher.

Subjects

Date Posted:      May 12, 2017

Note at Amazon.com[1]

Spying in the United States began during the Revolutionary War, with George Washington as the first director of American intelligence and Benedict Arnold as the first turncoat. The history of American espionage is full of intrigue, failures and triumphs–and motives honorable and corrupt. Several notorious spies became household names–Aldrich Ames, Robert Hanssen, the Walkers, the Rosenbergs–and were the subjects of major motion pictures and television series. Many others have received less attention.

This book summarizes hundreds of cases of espionage for and against U.S. interests and offers suggestions for further reading. Milestones in the history of American counterintelligence are noted. Charts describe the motivations of traitors, American targets of foreign intelligence services and American traitors and their foreign handlers. A former member of the U.S. intelligence community, the author discusses trends in intelligence gathering and what the future may hold. An annotated bibliography is provided, written by Hayden Peake, curator of the Historical Intelligence Collection of the Central Intelligence Agency.

[1] See Amazon.com

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Raven Rock

Title:                      Raven Rock

Author:                 Garrett M. Graff

Graff, Garrett M. (2017). Raven Rock: The Story of The U.S. Government’s Secret Plan to Save Itself-While The Rest of Us Die. New York: Simon and Schuster

LCCN:    2017004895

UA927

Summary

  • “The eye-opening truth about the government’s secret plans to survive a catastrophic attack on US soil–even if the rest of us die–a roadmap that spans from the dawn of the nuclear age to today”–Provided by publisher.

Contents

  • Project S-1 — Mr. Rance Campbell — The Beard Lot project — Apple Jack alert — The spirit of Camp David — The New Frontier — Cuban Missile Crisis — Angel is airborne — The Tyler precedent — The madman theory — Mount Pony — The unlikely hawk — War games — Designated survivor — Nine naught eight — 9/11 — The days after — Doomsday prepping.

Subjects

Date Posted:      May 11, 2017

Reviewed in The Intelligencer[1]

This is the government’s secret plans to survive a catastrophic attack on US soil—even if the rest of our citizens die. Every day in Washington, DC, the blue-and-gold 1st Helicopter Squadron, codenamed “MUSSEL,” flies over the Potomac River. As obvious as the Presidential motorcade, most people assume the squadron is a travel perk for VIPs. While the helicopters provide transport, the unit exists to evacuate high-ranking officials in the event of a terrorist or nuclear attack on Washington, DC. Select officials would be whisked by helicopters to a ring of secret bunkers around Washington; citizens are left to fend for themselves. No doubt this is a practice employed by most nations worldwide.

For sixty years, the US government has been developing secret Doomsday plans to protect itself, and the multibillion-dollar Continuity of Government (COG) program takes numerous forms—from its plans to evacuate the Liberty Bell from Philadelphia to the plans to launch nuclear missiles from a Boeing-747 jet flying high over Nebraska. In Raven Rock, Graff sheds light on the inner workings of the 650-acre compound (called Raven Rock) just miles from Camp David, as well as dozens of other bunkers the government built its top leaders during the Cold War, from the White House lawn to Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado to Palm Beach, Florida, and the secret plans that would have kicked in after a Cold War nuclear attack to round up foreigners and dissidents and nationalize industries. Equal parts a presidential, military, and cultural history, Graff tracks the evolution of the government plan and the threats of global war from the dawn of the nuclear era through the War on Terror.

[1] Reviewed in The Intelligencer: Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies (22, 3, Winter 2016-17, p. 138).

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Born to Spy

Title:                      Born to Spy

Author:                 Austin Goodrich

Goodrich, Austin (2006). Born to Spy: Recollections of a CIA Case Officer. Lincoln, NE: iUniverse

OCLC:    471519399

UB271 (estimated)

Subjects

Date Posted:      May 11, 2017

Retired CIA case officer Austin Goodrich chronicles his life from his formative years during the Great Depression in Battle Creek, Michigan, through near-death trauma in World War II, into service in the Central Intelligence Agency during the hottest years of the Cold War. Goodrich recounts the challenges and joys of growing up in an adult-free environment where kids got even with mean neighbors on Halloween, rolled their own cigarettes and swiped materials for their smoke-filled club houses. Motivated by patriotic and religious convictions, Goodrich served his country with distinction that earned him the Intelligence Medal of Merit.

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Spies In The Family

Title:                      Spies In The Family

Author:                 Eva Dillon

Dillon, Eva (2017). Spies In The Family: An American Spymaster, His Russian Crown Jewel, And The Friendship That Helped End The Cold War. New York, NY: HarperCollins

LCCN:    2017010000

E840.8.D483

Scope and content

  • “The true story of two spies and their families on opposite sides of the Cold War, told from the first-person perspective of Eva Dillon, the daughter of one of these spies. With impeccable insider access to both families as well as CIA officers, Dillon offers a riveting true-life spy thriller told in the tradition of a family memoir”–Provided by publisher.
  • “A riveting true-life thriller and revealing memoir from the daughter of an American intelligence officer–the astonishing true story of two spies and their families on opposite sides of the Cold War. In the summer of 1975, seventeen-year-old Eva Dillon’s family was living in New Delhi when her father was exposed as a CIA spy. Eva had long believed that her father was a U.S. State Department employee. She had no idea that he was handling the CIA’s highest-ranking double agent–Dmitri Fedorovich Polyakov–a Soviet general whose code name was TOPHAT. Dillon’s father and Polyakov had a close friendship that went back years, to their first meeting in Burma in the mid-1960s. At the height of the Cold War, the Russian offered the CIA an unfiltered view into the vault of Soviet intelligence. His collaboration helped ensure that tensions between the two nuclear superpowers did not escalate into a shooting war. Spanning fifty years and three continents, Spies in the Family is a deeply researched account of two families on opposite sides of the lethal espionage campaigns of the Cold War, and two men whose devoted friendship lasted a lifetime, until the devastating final days of their lives. With impeccable insider access to both families as well as knowledgeable CIA and FBI officers, Dillon goes beyond the fog of secrecy to craft an unforgettable story of friendship and betrayal, double agents and clandestine lives, that challenges our notions of patriotism, exposing the commonality between peoples of opposing political economic systems. Both a gripping tale of spy craft and a moving personal story, Spies in the Family is an invaluable and heart-rending work. Spies in the Family includes 25 black-and-white photos”–Provided by publisher.

Subjects

Date Posted:      May 10, 2017

Reviewed in The Intelligencer[1]

In the summer of1975, seventeen-year-old Eva Dillon was living in New Delhi with her family when her father was exposed as a CIA officer. Eva had long believed that her father was a US State Department employee. She had no idea that he was handling the CIA’s highest-ranking double agent–Dmitri Fedorovich Polyakov–a Soviet general whose code name was TOPHAT. Dillon’s father and Polyakov had a close friendship that went back years, to their first meeting in Burma in the mid-1960s. At the height of the Cold War, the Russian double agent offered the CIA an unfiltered view into the vault of Soviet intelligence. His collaboration helped ensure that tensions between the two nuclear superpowers did not escalate into a shooting war.

With insider access to both families as well as knowledgeable CIA and FBI officers, Dillon provides an account of two families on opposite sides of the lethal espionage campaigns of the Cold War, and two men whose devoted friendship lasted a lifetime, until the devastating final days of their lives.

[1] Reviewed in The Intelligencer: Journal of U.S. Intelligence Studies (22, 3, Winter 2016-17, p. 138).

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The Unlikely Priest

Title:                      The Unlikely Priest

Author:                  J. Perry Smith

Smith, J. Perry (2011). The Unlikely Priest: Bullfighter, Soldier, Spy And Then by God’s Grace A Priest. Jacksonville, FL.: Padre Nuestro Books

OCLC:    778369019

BX 4705 (estimated)

Subjects

Date Posted:      May 10, 2017

Reviewed by Lorraine Thompson[1]

Father J. Perry Smith, former vicar at Historic St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church in St. Augustine, and now Canon for Pastoral Care at St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Jacksonville, admits that finally, “I’m just who I want to be.”

The 67-year-old priest was ordained in 2002 after decades of soul-seeking and adventure, according to his book, The Unlikely Priest.

It was Halloween in 1954—a night that changed the path of life for a 10-year-old. While trick or treating near his home in rural West Virginia, Perry Smith and his brother David knocked on the door of a recluse who was reputed to be the richest woman in Logan County. The woman opened the door and before giving out treats asked the boys their names. She then inquired, “Which of you is the oldest?” Perry volunteered that he was 10 and his brother was 8.

“Oh you’re the adopted one,” she informed Perry.

That night and months later, his questions were partially answered, but his mother refused to tell him about his biological parents. “I was no longer who I thought I was,” Smith writes in his book.

It took decades before Smith would find the answers. During those years he attempted to define “who I wanted to be.”

After the death of his father a few years later, his mother and the two boys moved to California. In high school his interests focused on swimming and drama. He also developed a fascination with bull fighting which eventually took him to Mexico on weekends for training.

In his late teens he became interested in medicine and worked in the surgical wing of a California hospital. That job funded his weekend trips to train in Mexico where he would eventually relocate.

In 1964 he was called to his mother’s bedside as she lay near death. Even then she would not disclose his real identity. And she asked him to give up bull fighting.

Doubts of faith

Later, Smith talks about of doubts with his faith and religion.

Influenced by friends and acquaintances, he chose to become a Roman Catholic at a young age.

At age 19, and still struggling to find his identity, after much praying and consultations, Smith chose to live in a Trappist Monastery. At first it was a calming experience, but he soon realized that was not “who he wanted to be”.

Upon leaving the monastery, Smith became eligible for the draft. Instead of waiting for his number to be called up, he chose to join the U.S. Army. That was the start of more than 30 years of government service. After a stint in Vietnam, he eventually served in the CIA and the FBI, and quickly rose in rank and responsibilities.

His assignments took him to many of the world hotspots.

Throughout those years, Smith continued to search for the identity of his birth parents—and most important—why they gave him up for adoption.

In the late 1970s he found his answer and a new family. What happened then is documented in his book.

While on assignment in Central America Smith was shaken by the poverty he witnessed in overpopulated areas. As a Roman Catholic he began questioning the church’s position on birth control. He discussed the subject with a Panamanian Catholic Bishop in 1977. That conversation led Smith to abandon his Catholic faith.

As a dedicated government employee, Smith worked long days away from his wife, Penny, whom he married in 1968. Among his assignments were undercover work in Mexico, and key positions in Central America, Europe and several major U.S. assignments.

After two children and years of moving from place to place, his marriage became irreconcilable and ended in divorce.

Smith writes about becoming cynical of the criminal justice system. He also includes a dissertation that compares the similarities of the Roman Catholic Church, the Mafia and the FBI.

After 31 years in government service, Smith retired. Although he then knew who he was, he still had not found the answer for “who I want to be” until he became involved in the Episcopal Church.

In the early 1990s he embraced the religion with a new vigor and after much prayer, discussion and contemplation, Smith was ordained a deacon. A few years later he entered the seminary in Alexandria, Va.

In 2002, Mr. Smith became Father Smith and was assigned to Baltimore Emmanuel Church where his main duties were to minister to the sick and the dying.

In 2007, Father Smith was named bvcar of Historic St. Cyprian’s Episcopal Church in St. Augustine where he became a major force in rebuilding the parish.

In 2009, he was named Canon for Pastoral Care at St. John’s Episcopal Cathedral in Jacksonville where his assignment continues.

“It’s as though God has been my constant companion whether I realized it or not, as he somehow brought me to this life as a priest,” Smith commented.

After decades of searching for his real identity and often feeling alone and abandoned, “It is now obvious to me as well as to many of my friends that the whole of my life has been preparation for the priesthood.”

[1] Lorraine Thompson at staugustine.com The St. Augustine Record (January 19, 2012). Downloaded May 10, 2017

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