The Politics of Lying

Title:                  The Politics of Lying

Author:                 David Wise

Wise, David (1973). The Politics of Lying: Government Deception, Secrecy, and Power. New York: Random House

LCCN:    72013911

JK468.S4 W57

Subjects

Date Updated:  March 2, 2017

This book, quite old by now, is still a valuable resource when considering the seemingly contradictory, illogical, malfunctioning government we currently experience. Wise’s work is also useful, even today, to understand better how highly paid lobbyists for airlines and for defense contractors manage to raid the nation’s tax revenues on behalf of their clients whenever necessary to compensate for their own mistakes without fear of enforcement of compliance issues. For instance, after the most disastrous day in aviation history on 9/11/2001, the FAA Rapid Response Team requested suggestions from the public concerning immediate actions that should be taken to protect the public from further aviation terrorism.

An airline captain who reviewed this book said, “As an airline captain with many years of Boeing aircraft piloting experience, I suggested that aircraft be modified to provide the crew with sensor information about the presence of weapons of mass destruction in the cargo or clues about missiles being fired at the aircraft (e.g., TWA 800). In spite of more than a year of unpaid lobbying and my filing of a whistleblower claim, the aircraft manufacturers and airline operators have still managed to convince the government not to take any practical steps to mitigate the problem of unscreened cargo until an incident actually happens. “

The subject has been classified to hide the lack of progress. Meanwhile the [money] that would be required to modify 10,000 aircraft at [a price] is being wasted through airline subsidies that don’t address this continuing risk to the American public.

The author of this book is a member of the Association of Former Intelligence Officers (AFIO), and this book is listed on the Association’s website.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]

An informing, stinging critique of government deception, secrecy, and relations with the press including the technique of press leaks. See also the annotations in chapter 8, section A, and chapter 19.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[2]

An attack on government deception, secrecy, and the security classification system by an ex-newsman and author who, with Thomas B. Ross, has written extensively on intelligence. Because of this acquired knowledge of intelligence, much of the material on deception and secrecy revolves around intelligence-associated incidents. Contains some good insights into the decision-making process where public figures are forced by crises and disclosures of operations to try to deceive Americans for a variety of reasons, including valid security considerations. Also cited in chapter 7, section A, and chapter 19.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[3]

Part 2, “Secrecy,” includes brief descriptions of certain CIA covert operations. Chapter 8 is devoted to “The Case of the Colorado Tibetans,” who were trained by the CIA at Camp Hale, Colorado, during the period 1958-61. See also the annotation for this work in chapter 8, section A.

[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 79

[2] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 89

[3] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 216

 

 

 

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3 Responses to The Politics of Lying

  1. Pingback: The Craft We Chose | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

  2. Pingback: Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources, Chapter 8 | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

  3. Pingback: CIA: Covert Operations, Chapter 19 | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

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