The Spy of The Rebellion

Title:                      The Spy of The Rebellion

Author:                  Allan Pinkerton

Pinkerton, Allan (1883). The Spy of The Rebellion; being a true history of the spy system of the United States Army during the late rebellion. Revealing many secrets of the war hitherto not made public. Comp. from official reports prepared for President Lincoln, General McClellan and the provost-marshal-general. New York, G.W. Carleton & Co.

LCCN:    03028533

E608 .P65

Date Updated:  October 31, 2016

Allen Pinkerton’s book, The Spy Of The Rebellion; was published in the late 1800s. It starts out with information about Lincoln’s Presidential election, the attempted assassination of Lincoln that Pinkerton prevented and his involvement with the creation of the Secret Service as well as his spying activity during the Civil War. Pictured above is a copy of the book and the front of a four page 11 X 17 fold ad for the book along with how to go about becoming a “sales agent” for the book. It’s important to note that books in this time period were very expensive sometimes costing a week or more pay. The Spy Of The Rebellion was one of the more popular nonfiction books of its time period.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]

The autobiography of the detective-turned-spy who helped establish espionage for the U.S. Army in the early days of the Civil War. For a time, Pinkerton was chief of the intelligence service oi’ the Union forces under General McClellan.

[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 164

 

This entry was posted in Civil War and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to The Spy of The Rebellion

  1. Pingback: Civil War Espionage and Legend « Intelligence and Counterintelligence

  2. Pingback: Espionage and Counterespionage, Chapter 14 | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s