Double Agent

Title:                      Double Agent

Author:                John Huminik

Huminik, John (1967). Double Agent. New York: New American Library

LCCN:    67027433

UB271.U52 H8

Subjects

Date Updated:  January 26, 2017

Reviewed by George C. Constantinides[1]

This is the drawn-out story of a metallurgical specialist who operated as an FBI agent against the Soviets. Huminik claims he was a double agent for six years, but the actual time of his service depends on how one defines “double agent.” Much of what he tells of meetings with the Soviets (more than sixty-five in all) concerns developmental work by them. It was only toward the latter stages that he received payment and was asked to acquire classified information. There is thus much on Soviet techniques for developing a prospective agent in the private sector and the inducements offered. The case illustrates the problem faced by a CI service in running a double agent, even one who is not high-level or particularly sensitive (which Huminik was not, although he tends to overdramatize his own significance). The point was eventually reached at which a decision had to be made whether to provide any information of value to the Soviets so the case could continue. According to the author, the FBI staff directing him was amazed the operation continued as long as it did when only “junk” was passed to the Soviets; one consequently is left wondering about the Soviet purpose. FBI exposure was one of a series in 1966. See Sullivan’s The Bureau[2], in which the FBI’s Hoover is shown refusing to use this case for deception.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[3]

An account by a scientist and engineer of his recruitment by Soviet embassy personnel in Washington, D.C ., in 1960 for scientific and technological espionage purposes. The author spent six years as an agent of both Soviet intelligence and the FBI.

Further Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[4]

The memoirs of metallurgical specialist John Huminik’s six years as a spy for the USSR and counterspy for the FBI. Double Agent is written in a low-key manner and is one of the best accounts of agent and double agent handling available. As such it is a valuable supplement to Christopher Felix’s A Short Course in The Secret War[5]. For main entry, see chapter 10, section A.

[1] Constantinides, George C. (1983). Intelligence and Espionage: An Analytical Bibliography. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp. 244-245

[2] Sullivan, William J. (1979) The Bureau: My Thirty Years in Hoover’s FBI. New York: W.W. Norton

[3] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p.

[4] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 183

[5] Felix, Christopher (1992). A Short Course in The Secret War, 3rd ed. Lanham, MD: Madison Books

 

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2 Responses to Double Agent

  1. Pingback: Scientific and Technical Intelligence, Chapter 10 | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

  2. Pingback: Counterespionage, Chapter 15 | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

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