Allied Intelligence Bureau

Title:                      Allied Intelligence Bureau

Author:                 Allison Ind

Ind, Allison (1958). Allied Intelligence Bureau: Our Secret Weapon in The War Against Japan. New York: David McKay

LCCN:    58012259

D810.S7 I5

Subjects

Note

  • Published as Spy Ring Pacific: The Story of the Allied Intelligence Bureau in South East Asia [London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson]

Title:                      Allied Intelligence Bureau

Author:                                Allison Ind

Ind, Allison (1958). Allied Intelligence Bureau: Our Secret Weapon in The War Against Japan. New York: David McKay

LCCN:    58012259

D810.S7 I5

Subjects

Note

  • Published as Spy Ring Pacific: The Story of the Allied Intelligence Bureau in South East Asia [London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson]

Date Updated:  February 9, 2016

Reviewed by George C. Constantinides[1]

The Allied Intelligence Bureau (AIB) was, as Ind reminds us, a combined Allied intelligence organization and only one of several intelligence organizations under the control of General MacArthur in the Pacific in World War II. In it were represented the United States, Great Britain, Australia, and Holland. The AIB’s intelligence-collection operations and organizations are described, including the very effective Coastwatchers under the Australians. We are told of some of the special operations against Japanese targets, both successful and unsuccessful. Ind’s story is of great value because so little has been written about the AIB, and Ind, as deputy chief, was in a good position to tell it. He recounts unique or interesting events or operations that took place, such as that Japanese cipher systems were retrieved from beached Japanese ships and crashed aircraft or that AIB recruited Moslems as agents for use in the Far East with the approval of King Saud of Saudi Arabia. These agents were to stir up religious wars in the interest of the Allies; most were killed. There is no mention of the reading of Japanese codes; consequently, Ind has overdrawn the relative importance of AIB’s contributions to victory. Corson in The Armies of Ignorance[2] calls to our attention that General Charles Willoughby in his book on MacArthur quotes the latter as saying, “The history of AIB is a secret, little publicized but highly important chapter in the story of the Southwest Pacific.” Both MacArthur and Ind may have been right in their estimates of the AIB’s effectiveness, but we still need a more up-to-date treatment. Knowledgeable commentators have singled out Ind’s sections on operations into the Philippines as particularly good.

This is a review by the Defense Intelligence School.[3]

A description of U.S. and Allied intelligence operations conducted against the Japanese in the South and Southwest Pacific. Written by a senior official in the Allied Intelligence Bureau, the book is one of the few good sources available on this activity.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[4]

The Allied Intelligence Bureau (AIB) was the espionage and clandestine services arm of MacArthur’s intelligence staff, made up of American, Australian, British, and Dutch personnel , Colonel Ind, American deputy to the Australian head of AIB, emphasizes the activities of the Australian coast watchers, concealed on Japanese-held islands, in collecting information on naval and shipping movements and aircraft overflights. He also describes the intelligence gathering and paramilitary operations of the guerrilla bands in the Philippines, providing operational and methodological insights. The sabotage operations of the Services Reconnaissance Department of AIB against the enemy-held Celebes Islands and Borneo and against shipping in Singapore harbor are also described. For more on intelligence operations in the Philippines see Wise, William (1968). Secret Mission to The Philippines[5].

[1] Constantinides, George C. (1983). Intelligence and Espionage: An Analytical Bibliography. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, p. 252

[2] Corson, William R. (1977). The Armies of Ignorance. The Rise of The American Intelligence Empire. New York: Dial Pres

[3] Defense Intelligence School (1981). Bibliography of Intelligence Literature: A Critical And Annotated Bibliography of Open-Source Literature (7th ed, rev.). Washington, DC: Defense Intelligence School, p. 34

[4] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p.

[5] Wise, William (1968). Secret Mission to The Philippines; The Story of The “Spyron” And The American-Filipino Guerrillas of World War II. New York, Dutton

 

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