The Russian Secret Police

Title:                      The Russian Secret Police

Author:                 Ronald Hingley

Hingley, Ronald (1970, 1971). The Russian Secret Police: Muscovite, Imperial Russian, and Soviet Political Security Operations. New York: Simon & Schuster

LCCN:    70139628

HV8224 .H53 1971

Subjects

Date Updated:  April 22, 2016

This is a review by the Defense Intelligence School.[1]

An historical survey of Russian and Soviet intelligence and security activities from Ivan the Terrible through the Brezhnev-Kosygin regime until 1970. Though he adds no new insights or interpretations, the author has made a significant contribution by portraying the continuity of secret pol ice functions from the Tsarist through the Soviet periods. Well written, it provides good background reading for the person unfamiliar with the centuries-long tradition behind the KGB/GRU apparatus.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[2]

Hingley, one of England’s most eminent Russian scholars and a member of the Royal Army Intelligence Corps during World War II, provides a careful history of the role played by intelligence and security forces in internal Russian political life. He discusses the techniques of intrigue, provocation, and infiltration practiced by the Cheka, NKVD, MGB, and KGB within Russia.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[3]

The outstanding work on the subject by a distinguished British sovietologist who served with the Intelligence Corps of the Royal Army in World War II. Includes helpful notes and a highly selective bibliography of more than 300 listings. The author clearly describes and analyzes the changing political function of the security police and their complex relationships with other elements of the Russian government from the Oprichnina of 1565 to the KGB in the post-Khrushchev period. A unique book in that it is not an account of specific espionage operations, but rather a discussion of the techniques of intrigue, provocation, control of political dissidents, infiltration, and policing renegade Russian or Soviet citizens abroad who had been associated with the counterintelligence and internal security elements of the KGB or its antecedent organizations.

[1] Defense Intelligence School (1981). Bibliography of Intelligence Literature: A Critical And Annotated Bibliography of Open-Source Literature (7th ed, rev.). Washington, DC: Defense Intelligence School, p. 31

[2] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p.

[3] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 100

 

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3 Responses to The Russian Secret Police

  1. Pingback: Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources, Chapter 9 | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

  2. Pingback: Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage And Covert Operations | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

  3. Pingback: Blackstock Selected Bibliography of Fifty Titles | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

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