German Military Intelligence

Title:                      German Military Intelligence

Author:                 Paul Leverkuehn

Leverkuehn, Paul (1954). German Military Intelligence. London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson

LCCN:    55000069

D810.S7 L4

Subjects

Date Updated:  January 25, 2017

Reviewed by George C. Constantinides[1]

A reserve officer, Leverkuehn served with the Abwehr in Iran and then (1941-1944) in Turkey. He was chief of the Abwehr station in Istanbul and also responsible for Near East operations. He was suspected by Hitler at one time of contacts with the British, according to Brissaud’s The Nazi Secret Service[2]. Leverkuehn describes some of his experiences and his service’s organization and functions along with giving brief stories of some of its work in espionage and counterespionage. The result is a highly selective account, even allowing for Leverkuehn’s caveat that it was not his intent to write a complete history but to select the most typical or important episodes. There is much that he has left out or missed, and his loyalty to his old service and its ex-chief Admiral Canaris is undiminished. One must go to other writings to learn of the Abwehr’s stunning defeats at the hands of the Allied services or of Canaris’s activities within the service and the regime. Whaley alleged that Leverkuehn’s account was carefully censored by its British editor-translators, (see Codeword Barbarossa[3]). This, if correct, may account for Leverkuehn’ s not including significant Abwehr activities that he warns us at the beginning of the book are not to be found in the service’s files. The Klatt operation in Sofia is, however, given a short treatment. Leverkuehn’s views on Canaris are also discussed in Colvin’s Master Spy[4].

This is a review by the Defense Intelligence School.[5]

An account of German WWII intelligence activity written by a former German intelligence officer. The final chapter provides an insider’s view of the famed Admiral Canaris, head of the German Abwehr.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[6]

A useful account of the methods, procedures, and techniques of the Abwehr—the Wehrmacht intelligence service, composed of army, navy, air force, and civilian personnel. Largely a collection of brief stories of espionage and intrigue, authored by a reserve officer who served with the Abwehr in Iran and Turkey.

Further review by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[7]

During World War II the author was chief of German military intelligence (Abwehr) in Turkey and the Near East, and describes some of his experiences. However, he has also attempted to write a history of the Abwehr that spells out its organization and functions. The Abwehr was a joint army, navy, and air force intelligence organization of the general staff, headed by an admiral, Canaris. Its establishment preceded by about thirty years the setting up of a joint military intelligence organization in the United States, the Defense Intelligence Agency. For an account of the takeover of military intelligence in 1944 by the Nazi party intelligence agency see Walter Schellenberg’s The Labyrinth[8].

Another Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[9]

In the chapter “Espionage and Counterespionage,” Paul Leverkuehn, a senior member of Germany’s wartime military intelligence service, the Abwehr, describes its counterespionage organization and functions and the division of responsibilities be-tween the Abwehr and the political intelligence and security arm of the Gestapo. An organization chart of the Abwehr is included.

[1] Constantinides, George C. (1983). Intelligence and Espionage: An Analytical Bibliography. Boulder, CO: Westview Press, pp. 289-290

[2] Brissaud, André (1974). The Nazi Secret Service. New York: W. W. Norton

[3] Whaley, Barton (1973). Codeword BARBAROSSA. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press

[4] Colvin, Ian (1951, 1952). Master Spy: The Incredible Story of Admiral Wilhelm Canaris, Who, While Hitler’s Chief of Intelligence, Was A Secret Ally of the British. New York: McGraw-Hill.

[5] Defense Intelligence School (1981). Bibliography of Intelligence Literature: A Critical And Annotated Bibliography of Open-Source Literature (7th ed, rev.). Washington, DC: Defense Intelligence School, p. 40

[6] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p.

[7] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 64

[8] Schellenberg, Walter (1956, 2000). The Labyrinth: Memoirs of Walter Schellenberg, Hitler’s Chief of Counterintelligence. Boulder, CO: Da Capo Press

[9] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 181

 

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One Response to German Military Intelligence

  1. Pingback: Counterespionage, Chapter 15 | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

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