War of Wits

Title:                      War of Wits

Author:                  Ladislas Farago

Farago, Ladislas (1954, 1976). War of Wits: The Anatomy of Espionage And Intelligence. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press

LCCN:    75031362

UB250

Subjects

Notes

  • Reprint of the ed. published by Funk & Wagnalls, New York.

Date Updated:  March 22, 2016

KIRKUS REVIEW

In the belief that people should be informed about intelligence in order to further it, Ladislas Farago, an expert in the field, tells of the aims, organization, and operation of the “war of wits”. He methodically goes through positive intelligence:-the collection, procurement, evaluation and dissemination of information; the levels from policy to tactical; espionage; sabotage—and on to negative or counter intelligence (the safeguarding of information), then points out the place and nature of propaganda, white, grey or black. Throughout, there are numerous examples of intelligence at work that reveal both its importance and its processes. How an agent should act in enemy territory; how the RAF changed from offensive to defensive strategy, how a counter-espionage agent disposed of a German spy ring in the U. S. in 1941; how the Norsk Hydro, where Germany worked on atomic weapons, was sabotaged; how the amazing woman expert, Dr. Schragmuller, trained spies—these are some of the cases that point up an amazingly candid and informative book.

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]

A more or less journalistic treatment of the complete panorama of intelligence and its allied subjects—counterintelligence, espionage, sabotage, and psychological warfare. The author was affiliated with naval intelligence during World War II. Twenty-four pages of notes and references present useful bibliographic source material.

Further comments by Paul Blackstock and Frank Schaf[2]

This prolific author on intelligence discusses the evolution end some of the theory of counterintelligence, and describes some of the activities of the various counterintelligence agencies, including censorship activities.

[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 15

[2] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., p. 75-76

 

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One Response to War of Wits

  1. Pingback: The Literature of Intelligence | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

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