None of Your Business

Title:                      None of Your Business

Author:                  Norman Dorsen

Dorsen, Noman (1974) and Stephen Gillers, eds. None of Your Business; Government Secrecy in America. New York: Viking Press

LCCN:    73017685

JK468.S4 C65 1973

Subjects

Notes

  • “Proceedings of a conference … held in New York on May 18-19, 1973, sponsored jointly by the Committee for Public Justice and the Arthur Garfield Hays Civil Liberties Program.”
  • Includes bibliographical references.

Date Posted:      April 8, 2016

Reviewed by Paul W. Blackstock and Frank L. Schaf[1]

A conference was held in New York in May 1973 by the Committee for Public Justice and the New York University Law School. The results are published as an assortment of essays by leading public figures, historians, lawyers, journalists, and political scientists whose overall thrust is an exploration of the political implications of governmental secrecy with in a democratic society. Each contributor has a different perception about the degree of public scrutiny that should be afforded to classified. government information; however, most of the participants favor the formation of a more open government that would function with the support of an informed, intelligent electorate. Professor M.L. Stein’s discussion of the prevalence of secrecy in local government forges an interesting link between local secrecy and national attitudes towards secrecy as displayed in Watergate. Morton H. Halperin and Jeremy J. Stone highlight several of the CIA’s “dirty tricks” abroad and recommend the dismantling of the CIA covert operations department

[1] Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co., pp. 85-86

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