Escape and Evasion, Chapter 12

Title:                      Escape and Evasion, Chapter 12

Author:                 Paul W. Blackstock

Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. “Chapter 12: “Escape and Evasion,” Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations: A Guide to Information Sources. Detroit: Gale Research Co.

LCCN:    74011567

Z6724.I7 B55

Subjects

Intelligence service–Bibliography.

Espionage–Bibliography.

Subversive activities–Bibliography.

Date Updated:  June 16, 2016

Date Updated:  July 11, 2016

Chapter 12 ESCAPE AND EVASION

World War II in Europe saw the beginning of the large-scale development of escape and evasion (E&E) as an increasingly important intelligence function. The British were the leaders in this expansion, understandably, since a program for the return of downed air crews, who represented a considerable investment in training and experience, was a matter of national necessity, Special elements of organization were set up in intelligence to plan, develop, and operate escape lines from occupied Europe, and a special research and development program was established to provide equipment and devices that would aid in escape and evasion (see Clayton Hutton, Official Secret[1]). When the Americans entered the war, they participated in the development of E&E aids in the OSS technical equipment program and through the programs of the civilian National Defense Research Committee and the Office of Scientific Research and Development (NDRC/OSRC). Escape and evasion had different requirements in the Pacific theaters where jungle survival became part of the evolving E&E doctrine.

The literature is abundantly supplied with E&E books, mostly of British origin. However, with the Korean and Vietnam experiences, E&E books by Americans have increased in number. The best stories of escape and evasion during the Vietnam War have not yet been written.

Blair, Clay(1955). Beyond Courage. Foreword by Nathan F. Twining. New York, D. McKay Co.

Crawley, Aidan (1956). Escape From Germany: A History of RAF Escapes During The War. New York: Simon and Schuster

Howarth, David Armine (1951). Across to Norway. New York: Sloane

Hutton, Clayton (1961). Official Secret: The Remarkable Story of Escape Aids—Their Invention, Production And The Sequel. New York: Crown [London: M. Parrish, 1960]

Sunderman, James F. (1963). Air Escape And Evasion. New York: F. Watts

  1. S. Department of the Army (1969, 1990). Survival, Evasion, And Escape. Available from El Dorado, AR: Desert Publications

[1] Hutton, Clayton (1961). Official Secret: The Remarkable Story of Escape Aids—Their Invention, Production And The Sequel. New York: Crown [London: M. Parrish, 1960]

 

This entry was posted in Escape and evasion and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Escape and Evasion, Chapter 12

  1. Pingback: Intelligence, Espionage, Counterespionage, And Covert Operations, Part II | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s