OSS—The U.S. Office of Strategic Service, Chapter 18

Title:                      OSS—The U.S. Office of Strategic Service, Chapter 18

Author:                 Paul W. Blackstock

Blackstock, Paul W. (1978) and Frank L. Schaf, Jr. “Chapter 18: “OSS—The U.S. Office of Strategic Service”. Detroit: Gale Research Co.

LCCN:    74011567

Z6724.I7 B55

Subjects

Intelligence service–Bibliography.

Espionage–Bibliography.

Subversive activities–Bibliography.

Date Updated:  March 24, 2017

Chapter 18

Until recently (1976) historians and political scientists have been denied access to the OSS archives so that there is no comprehensive work on the OSS comparable to Foot’s book on the British SOE, SOE in France[1]. The CIA is the custodian of the OSS files and recently, under the terms of the Freedom of Information Act, has made some documents available to authors preparing books on the OSS. The CIA declassified, in 1976, the War Report of the Office of Strategic Services (see Anthony Cave Brown’s The Secret War Report of The OSS[2]), and in another case the CIA has released more than 200 documents to an ex-OSS member who is writing about his experiences in Hanoi. Brown’s The Secret War Report of The OSS and Richard Harris Smith’s OSS: The Secret History of America’s First Central Intelligence Agency[3] are the standouts in authoritative and helpful OSS literature. Much of the remainder consists of memoirs or accounts of individual episodes or adventures.

  1. GENERAL WORKS

Alsop, Stewart (1946, 1964) and Thomas Braden. Sub Rosa: The OSS And American Espionage. New York: Harcourt, Brace and World

Asprey, Robert B. (1975). War in The Shadows: The Guerrilla In History. Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday

Cave Brown, Anthony (1976) ed. The Secret War Report of The OSS. New York: Berkley

Ford, Corey (1946) and Maj. Alastair McBain. Cloak And Dagger; The Secret Story of OSS. New York: Random House

Hymoff, Edward (1972). The OSS in World War II. New York: Ballantine Books

Smith, R. Harris (2005). OSS: The Secret History of America’s First Central Intelligence Agency. Guilford, CT: Lyons Press

  1. MEMOIRS AND BIOGRAPHIES

Ford, Corey (1970). Donovan of OSS. New York: Little, Brown

Hall, Roger  (1957, 2004). You’re Stepping on My Cloak And Dagger. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press

Icardi, Aldo (1956). Aldo Icardi, American Master Spy. New York, University Books

Kaufman, Louis (1974, 1975) Barbara Fitzgerald, and Tom Sewell. Moe Berg: Athlete, Scholar, Spy. Boston: Little, Brown

Phillips, William (1952). Ventures in Diplomacy. North Beverly?, MA: Priv. print.

Taylor, Edmond (1969, 1971). Awakening From History. London: Chatto & Windus

  1. NETWORKS AND OPERATIONS

Alcorn, Robert Hayden (1965). No Banners, No Bands; More Tales Of The OSS. New York: D. McKay

Alcorn, Robert Hayden (1962). No Bugles for Spies: Tales of the OSS. New York: David McKay

Booth, Waller B. (1972). Mission Marcel-Proust; The Story of An Unusual OSS Undertaking. Philadelphia: Dorrance

Downes, Donald (1953). The Scarlet Thread: Adventures in Wartime Espionage. London: Derek Vershoyle

Dulles, Allen (1947, 2000). Germany’s Underground. New York: Da Capo Press

Dulles, Allen W. (1966). The Secret Surrender. New York: Harper and Row. [London: Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1967].

Klein, Alexander (1958) The Counterfeit Traitor. New York: Holt

Morgan, William J. (1955). Spies and Saboteurs. London: Gollancz

Murray, Henry A. (1948) and the OSS assessment staff. Assessment of Men : Selection of Personnel for The Office of Strategic Services. New York: Rinehart

Tompkins, Peter (1966). Italy Betrayed. New York: Simon and Schuster

Tompkins, Peter (1965). The Murder of Admiral Darlan, A Study In Conspiracy. New York, Simon and Schuster

Tompkins, Peter (1962). A Spy in Rome. New York: Simon and Schuster

  1. OSS IN THE FAR EAST AND SOUTHEAST ASIA

The OSS operated in the China-Burma:-India theater of operations and in Ceylon, Thailand, and Indochina. In China there was some controversy when the OSS started up activities after other organizations had already organized for intelligence and guerrilla operations. Some insight into these problems is provided in Milton Miles’s A Different Kind of War[4] (cited in chapter 6) and in Roy O. Stratton’s SACO: The Rice Paddy Navy[5]. In the part of the Pacific theater of operations commanded by MacArthur, the OSS was virtually excluded from setting up detachments. Supposedly MacArthur already had his espionage and sabotage and guerrilla operations well in hand in his Allied Intelligence Bureau, and in any case MacArthur resisted in his area organizations that reported directly to Washington and not to him. The best single source of material on the tangled webs of controversy and the best expose of OSS activity in China, India, Indochina, Burma, Ceylon, and Thailand is Richard Harris Smith’s OSS: The Secret History of America’s First Central Intelligence Agency[6], especially chapters 8 through 10 (see section A, this chapter).

Barrett, David D. (1970). Dixie Mission: The United States Army Observer Group in Yenan, 1944. Berkeley, CA: Berkeley, Center for Chinese Studies, University of California

Peers, William R. (1963) and Dean Brelis. Behind the Burma Road: The Story of America’s Most Successful Guerrilla Force. Boston: Little, Brown

[1] Foot, M.R.D. (1966). SOE In France: An Account of The Work of British Special Operations Executive in France 1940-1944. London: H.M. Stationery Off

[2] Cave Brown, Anthony (1976) ed. The Secret War Report of The OSS. New York: Berkley

[3] Smith, R. Harris (2005). OSS: The Secret History of America’s First Central Intelligence Agency. Guilford, CT: Lyons Press

[4] Miles, Milton (1967). A Different Kind of War: The Little-Known Story of The Combined Guerrilla Forces Created in China by The U.S. Navy And The Chinese During World War II. Garden City, NY: Doubleday

[5] Stratton, Roy Olin (1950). SACO—The Rice Paddy Navy. Pleasantville, NY: C. S. Palmer

[6] Smith, R. Harris (2005). OSS: The Secret History of America’s First Central Intelligence Agency. Guilford, CT: Lyons Press

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One Response to OSS—The U.S. Office of Strategic Service, Chapter 18

  1. Pingback: Covert Operations, Part IV | Intelligence Analysis and Reporting

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